DISABILITY ETIQUETTE GUIDE



Disability Etiquette Guide

What is Disability Etiquette? National Disability Navigator. "Disability etiquette" exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them. More than that, however, these guidelines are evolving to approximate social etiquette among the non-disabled, in hope that people with disabilities will be treated with "common courtesy.", Disability Etiquette Guide. The Tennessee Disability Coalition designed a Disability Etiquette Brochure to help people know how to appropriately engage with people with disabilities. Too often, people without disabilities are uncomfortable around people with disabilities because they are not sure what is appropriate and what is not..

Disability Etiquette

What is Disability Etiquette? National Disability Navigator. DISABILITY ETIQUETTE 101. General etiquette • Speak about a person with a disability by first referring to the person and then to . the disability. Refer to “people who are blind” rather than to “blind people.” • When talking with a person with a disability, speak directly to that person rather, Guide dogs and other service animals are working animals. Do not pet or touch them unless you have specifi c permission. Do not touch a person with a disability unless there is a good reason, such requested assistance. However, you may gently touch a deaf person to get their attention. Never push a person’s wheelchair without their permission..

DISABILITY AWARENESS & ETIQUETTE GUIDE . Guide for Centers for Independent Living and American Job Centers . Prepared by the LEAD Center, in Partnership with the . Job Accommodation Network and National Council on Independent Living . March 2016 . Preparation of this Guide was funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability 21-05-2019 · A Student's Guide to Disability Etiquette Greetings. When introduced to someone with a disability, a non-disabled individual may react to this person's appearance or affected speech. These reactions are usually somewhat reflexive, but for the sake of inclusion it is important to refrain from looks, gestures, or statements that will make the

Disability etiquette is a set of guidelines that assist your interaction with people with disability when: • Meeting for the first time. • Writing about them. • Providing assistance. • Simply enjoying their company. Of course you should show courtesy to everyone you meet, but some additional considerations will make your Respectful Interactions: Disability Language and Etiquette. Print-Friendly PDF Large-Print PDF. This guidance sheet offers tips and advice from people who have disabilities to help put everyone at ease. Because no two people disabilites are exactly alike, it is best to ask the person and follow the person's lead when it comes to what works best for them. Respectful Language. People-first language is based …

Accessible Language: A Guide for Disability Etiquette The use of certain words or phrases can express bias either intentionally or unintentionally. Below are some general rules for writing or talking about people with disabilities, followed by tips on interacting, and a short glossary of outdated terms and suggested alternatives. "Disability etiquette" exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them. More than that, however, these guidelines are evolving to approximate social etiquette among the non-disabled, in hope that people with disabilities will be treated with "common courtesy."

19-06-2019 · Disability etiquette isn’t just following a bunch of rules. Or memorizing all kinds of guidelines and tips. It all boils down to common sense and courtesy. To treat other people the way you would want to be treated. Disability Etiquette Training. Some companies offer disability etiquette training. This can help employees understand how to 27-06-2018 · The following etiquette tips address a wide range of workplace situations involving employees with motor or mobility impairments, sensory impairments, and cognitive or psychiatric impairments. This publication is not a comprehensive guide to disability etiquette in the workplace. For more information about disability etiquette, see the

What do Navigators Need to Know about Disability? How is Disability Defined? What Disability Questions Appear on the Streamlined Application for Health Insurance or Medicaid Submitted through the Marketplace? Why is Understanding Disability Important? What is Disability Literacy? What is Disability Etiquette? What is Physical Accessibility? and disability awareness training, mainly targeting OCOG’s staff members and Games volunteers. Such training aims to address attitudinal and communication barriers and has three main phases: a) General disability etiquette training, b) Games/job specific accessibility training and c) Venue-specific accessibility training.

"Disability etiquette" exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them. More than that, however, these guidelines are evolving to approximate social etiquette among the non-disabled, in hope that people with disabilities will be treated with "common courtesy." An Introductory Guide to Disability Language and Empowerment. Greetings from the Syracuse University Disability Cultural Center (DCC)! The purpose of this language guide is to provide you with some information on the different types of language that are used frequently when communicating about disability.

Disability Etiquette Secretary of State of Idaho

disability etiquette guide

Disability Guide National Disability Navigator Resource. A GUIDE TO DISABILITY ETIQUETTE & USING RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE IN THE WORKPLACE. 1. 1. Be Yourself. As in any new situation, everyone will feel more comfortable if you relax. 2. Meeting Someone People who use wheelchairs may have a variety of disabilities., Disability Etiquette Guide The Basics ASK BEFORE YOU HELP Interact with the person as a person first! Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume he or she needs help. Offer assistance only if the person appears to need it, and ask how you may help before you act..

A Guide to Disability Rights Laws ADA

disability etiquette guide

Guide to Disability Etiquette and Using Respectful Language in the. An Introductory Guide to Disability Language and Empowerment. Greetings from the Syracuse University Disability Cultural Center (DCC)! The purpose of this language guide is to provide you with some information on the different types of language that are used frequently when communicating about disability. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Disability_etiquette/Archive_1 The Disability Etiquette course is designed for all employees of an organization, since every employee will most certainly encounter a person with a disability in their work at some point. It includes tips to use during meetings, while talking to people, and in other situations. Some things are obvious, but others may surprise you..

disability etiquette guide

  • INTERNATIONAL PARALYMPIC COMMITTEE Accessibility Guide
  • DISABILITY ETIQUETTE United Spinal Association

  • United Spinal Association's Disability Etiquette Publication offers tips on interacting with people with disabilities and feeling at ease about it. This booklet is for anyone—with or without a disability—who wants to interact more effectively with people with disabilities. General etiquette guidelines. If you are having a conversation with someone with a disability, it’s a good idea to: Use the same tone with everyone you talk to. Talk to the individual with a disability the same way you would to someone without a disability.

    Disability etiquette is a set of guidelines dealing specifically with how to approach a person with a disability. There is no consensus on when this phrase first came into use, although it most likely grew out of the Disability Rights Movement that began in the early 1970s. 07-09-2015 · If we’re not used to dealing with disabled people, we may feel awkward when we come across someone with a disability. We may not know how best to help them – and we might cause offence without

    • Guide a person by offering the use of your arm (at or about the elbow), walking normally • Not all people with visual disabilities use Braille Source: Interaction & Etiquette Tips, United Cerebral Palsy (National) Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment:

    Guide to Disability Etiquette and Language It is impossible to produce a definitive guide on disability language and etiquette. However, we hope that this guide will provide you with enough information to help you to feel confident and be competent in your interactions with disabled people. It has been produced in conjunction with This 3 minute and 40 second YouTube video from the D.C. Office of Disability Rights discusses general rules of etiquette for interacting with people with disabilities. We encourage you to watch this short disability sensitivity training video before working with someone with a disability.

    Disability Etiquette Guide Revised 6/19 3 General Guidelines for Talking About Different Disabilities There are many words to use and ways to refer to individuals with a disability. The following information is meant to answer some questions about what language to use and not to use. A few basics of disability etiquette. Disability etiquette are sets of guidelines for interacting with people with disabilities that are provided by various disability rights organizations. The following are a few examples of common guidelines.

    27-06-2018В В· The following etiquette tips address a wide range of workplace situations involving employees with motor or mobility impairments, sensory impairments, and cognitive or psychiatric impairments. This publication is not a comprehensive guide to disability etiquette in the workplace. For more information about disability etiquette, see the A GUIDE TO DISABILITY ETIQUETTE & USING RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE IN THE WORKPLACE. 1. 1. Be Yourself. As in any new situation, everyone will feel more comfortable if you relax. 2. Meeting Someone People who use wheelchairs may have a variety of disabilities.

    Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment: Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties

    disability etiquette guide

    Accessible Language: A Guide for Disability Etiquette The use of certain words or phrases can express bias either intentionally or unintentionally. Below are some general rules for writing or talking about people with disabilities, followed by tips on interacting, and a short glossary of outdated terms and suggested alternatives. Disability Etiquette Guide The Basics ASK BEFORE YOU HELP Interact with the person as a person first! Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume he or she needs help. Offer assistance only if the person appears to need it, and ask how you may help before you act.

    Working With Students With Disabilities An Etiquette Guide

    disability etiquette guide

    An Introductory Guide to Disability Language and Empowerment. 27-06-2018 · The following etiquette tips address a wide range of workplace situations involving employees with motor or mobility impairments, sensory impairments, and cognitive or psychiatric impairments. This publication is not a comprehensive guide to disability etiquette in the workplace. For more information about disability etiquette, see the, An estimated one billion or 15% of the world’s population experience some form of disability or the other. About 26.8 million people with disabilities live in India alone. 13.4 million of them fall in the employable age group of 15-59 years and as many as 9.9 million are either non-workers or marginal workers. Over a decade or more, a lot has been done in the field of disability in terms of awareness generation and ….

    Guide to Disability Etiquette and Using Respectful Language in the

    Disability Etiquette Office of Compliance and Equity Management. 27-06-2018В В· The following etiquette tips address a wide range of workplace situations involving employees with motor or mobility impairments, sensory impairments, and cognitive or psychiatric impairments. This publication is not a comprehensive guide to disability etiquette in the workplace. For more information about disability etiquette, see the, Click here for a video presentation on Disability Etiquette. General Behavior. A wheelchair, cane, or any other assistive device used to help a person with a disability is considered part of their personal space and should never be leaned on, picked up, or touched..

    • Guide a person by offering the use of your arm (at or about the elbow), walking normally • Not all people with visual disabilities use Braille Source: Interaction & Etiquette Tips, United Cerebral Palsy (National) 21-05-2019 · A Student's Guide to Disability Etiquette Greetings. When introduced to someone with a disability, a non-disabled individual may react to this person's appearance or affected speech. These reactions are usually somewhat reflexive, but for the sake of inclusion it is important to refrain from looks, gestures, or statements that will make the

    Disability Etiquette Guide Revised 6/19 3 General Guidelines for Talking About Different Disabilities There are many words to use and ways to refer to individuals with a disability. The following information is meant to answer some questions about what language to use and not to use. Disability Etiquette Guide Revised 6/19 3 General Guidelines for Talking About Different Disabilities There are many words to use and ways to refer to individuals with a disability. The following information is meant to answer some questions about what language to use and not to use.

    Disability etiquette is a set of guidelines that assist your interaction with people with disability when: • Meeting for the first time. • Writing about them. • Providing assistance. • Simply enjoying their company. Of course you should show courtesy to everyone you meet, but some additional considerations will make your The Disability Etiquette course is designed for all employees of an organization, since every employee will most certainly encounter a person with a disability in their work at some point. It includes tips to use during meetings, while talking to people, and in other situations. Some things are obvious, but others may surprise you.

    The Employers’ Forum on Disability also publishes a Disability Communications Guide on language and etiquette, specific impairments and preferred modes of assistance, and how to recognise and avoid attitudes and behaviour that can create 19-06-2019 · Disability etiquette isn’t just following a bunch of rules. Or memorizing all kinds of guidelines and tips. It all boils down to common sense and courtesy. To treat other people the way you would want to be treated. Disability Etiquette Training. Some companies offer disability etiquette training. This can help employees understand how to

    Respectful Interactions: Disability Language and Etiquette. Print-Friendly PDF Large-Print PDF. This guidance sheet offers tips and advice from people who have disabilities to help put everyone at ease. Because no two people disabilites are exactly alike, it is best to ask the person and follow the person's lead when it comes to what works best for them. Respectful Language. People-first language is based … Click here for a video presentation on Disability Etiquette. General Behavior. A wheelchair, cane, or any other assistive device used to help a person with a disability is considered part of their personal space and should never be leaned on, picked up, or touched.

    An estimated one billion or 15% of the world’s population experience some form of disability or the other. About 26.8 million people with disabilities live in India alone. 13.4 million of them fall in the employable age group of 15-59 years and as many as 9.9 million are either non-workers or marginal workers. Over a decade or more, a lot has been done in the field of disability in terms of awareness generation and … "Disability etiquette" exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them. More than that, however, these guidelines are evolving to approximate social etiquette among the non-disabled, in hope that people with disabilities will be treated with "common courtesy."

    A GUIDE TO DISABILITY ETIQUETTE & USING RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE IN THE WORKPLACE. 1. 1. Be Yourself. As in any new situation, everyone will feel more comfortable if you relax. 2. Meeting Someone People who use wheelchairs may have a variety of disabilities. 07-09-2015 · If we’re not used to dealing with disabled people, we may feel awkward when we come across someone with a disability. We may not know how best to help them – and we might cause offence without

    Disability Etiquette Guide The Basics ASK BEFORE YOU HELP Interact with the person as a person first! Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume he or she needs help. Offer assistance only if the person appears to need it, and ask how you may help before you act. 06-05-2019 · Disability Rights Iowa presents some quick pointers for poll workers on interacting with the disability community! For more information, visit https://drivot...

    Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties • Guide a person by offering the use of your arm (at or about the elbow), walking normally • Not all people with visual disabilities use Braille Source: Interaction & Etiquette Tips, United Cerebral Palsy (National)

    Cook Ross Inc. www.cookross.com The research, editing, and production of this Disability Etiquette Guide is made possible by the financial support of AOL, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Merck. “Our vision at Merck is to be the #1 trusted health care partner to all people globally. We view people with disabilities as differently able, and as key Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment:

    06-05-2019В В· Disability Rights Iowa presents some quick pointers for poll workers on interacting with the disability community! For more information, visit https://drivot... Basic disability etiquette involves treating people with disabilities with respect. For example, speak to the person directly, not to the person accompanying them. Do not make assumptions about what they can or cannot do. The impact of a specific disability can vary widely from person to person, so offer assistance only if it appears to be

    DISABILITY AWARENESS & ETIQUETTE GUIDE . Guide for Centers for Independent Living and American Job Centers . Prepared by the LEAD Center, in Partnership with the . Job Accommodation Network and National Council on Independent Living . March 2016 . Preparation of this Guide was funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability General etiquette guidelines. If you are having a conversation with someone with a disability, it’s a good idea to: Use the same tone with everyone you talk to. Talk to the individual with a disability the same way you would to someone without a disability.

    A GUIDE TO DISABILITY ETIQUETTE & USING RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE IN THE WORKPLACE. 1. 1. Be Yourself. As in any new situation, everyone will feel more comfortable if you relax. 2. Meeting Someone People who use wheelchairs may have a variety of disabilities. Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment:

    Disability Etiquette for Poll Workers YouTube. and disability awareness training, mainly targeting OCOG’s staff members and Games volunteers. Such training aims to address attitudinal and communication barriers and has three main phases: a) General disability etiquette training, b) Games/job specific accessibility training and c) Venue-specific accessibility training., Disability Etiquette Guide The Basics ASK BEFORE YOU HELP Interact with the person as a person first! Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume he or she needs help. Offer assistance only if the person appears to need it, and ask how you may help before you act..

    Disability etiquette Remploy

    disability etiquette guide

    Disability Etiquette askearn.org. An Introductory Guide to Disability Language and Empowerment. Greetings from the Syracuse University Disability Cultural Center (DCC)! The purpose of this language guide is to provide you with some information on the different types of language that are used frequently when communicating about disability., Disability etiquette is a set of guidelines dealing specifically with how to approach disabled people. The rules of etiquette and good manners for interacting with disabled people are generally the same as the rules for good etiquette in society..

    Disability Etiquette askearn.org. Accessible Language: A Guide for Disability Etiquette The use of certain words or phrases can express bias either intentionally or unintentionally. Below are some general rules for writing or talking about people with disabilities, followed by tips on interacting, and a short glossary of outdated terms and suggested alternatives., • Guide a person by offering the use of your arm (at or about the elbow), walking normally • Not all people with visual disabilities use Braille Source: Interaction & Etiquette Tips, United Cerebral Palsy (National).

    Guide to Disability Etiquette and Language

    disability etiquette guide

    A Guide to Interacting with People who have Disabilities. An estimated one billion or 15% of the world’s population experience some form of disability or the other. About 26.8 million people with disabilities live in India alone. 13.4 million of them fall in the employable age group of 15-59 years and as many as 9.9 million are either non-workers or marginal workers. Over a decade or more, a lot has been done in the field of disability in terms of awareness generation and … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Disability_etiquette/Archive_1 Service Animal Guidelines, courtesy of The Guide Dog Foundation and America's VetDogs. Etiquette for Guide and Service Dogs (PDF) Guide dogs are the guiding eyes for people who are blind or visually impaired. Service dogs are assistance dogs for people with disabilities other than blindness. These dogs are specially bred and trained for this.

    disability etiquette guide

  • Disability Etiquette Guide workwithoutlimits.org
  • Disability Etiquette & People First Language
  • DISABILITY ETIQUETTE United Spinal Association
  • Disability Etiquette Interacting With People With Disabilities

  • Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties Service Animal Guidelines, courtesy of The Guide Dog Foundation and America's VetDogs. Etiquette for Guide and Service Dogs (PDF) Guide dogs are the guiding eyes for people who are blind or visually impaired. Service dogs are assistance dogs for people with disabilities other than blindness. These dogs are specially bred and trained for this

    Respectful Interactions: Disability Language and Etiquette. Print-Friendly PDF Large-Print PDF. This guidance sheet offers tips and advice from people who have disabilities to help put everyone at ease. Because no two people disabilites are exactly alike, it is best to ask the person and follow the person's lead when it comes to what works best for them. Respectful Language. People-first language is based … Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment:

    An estimated one billion or 15% of the world’s population experience some form of disability or the other. About 26.8 million people with disabilities live in India alone. 13.4 million of them fall in the employable age group of 15-59 years and as many as 9.9 million are either non-workers or marginal workers. Over a decade or more, a lot has been done in the field of disability in terms of awareness generation and … Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties

    General etiquette guidelines. If you are having a conversation with someone with a disability, it’s a good idea to: Use the same tone with everyone you talk to. Talk to the individual with a disability the same way you would to someone without a disability. General etiquette guidelines. If you are having a conversation with someone with a disability, it’s a good idea to: Use the same tone with everyone you talk to. Talk to the individual with a disability the same way you would to someone without a disability.

    Guide to Disability Etiquette and Language It is impossible to produce a definitive guide on disability language and etiquette. However, we hope that this guide will provide you with enough information to help you to feel confident and be competent in your interactions with disabled people. It has been produced in conjunction with Disability Etiquette Guide. The Tennessee Disability Coalition designed a Disability Etiquette Brochure to help people know how to appropriately engage with people with disabilities. Too often, people without disabilities are uncomfortable around people with disabilities because they are not sure what is appropriate and what is not.

    Disability Etiquette Guide Revised 6/19 3 General Guidelines for Talking About Different Disabilities There are many words to use and ways to refer to individuals with a disability. The following information is meant to answer some questions about what language to use and not to use. 27-06-2018В В· The following etiquette tips address a wide range of workplace situations involving employees with motor or mobility impairments, sensory impairments, and cognitive or psychiatric impairments. This publication is not a comprehensive guide to disability etiquette in the workplace. For more information about disability etiquette, see the

    Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties Guide to Disability Etiquette and Language It is impossible to produce a definitive guide on disability language and etiquette. However, we hope that this guide will provide you with enough information to help you to feel confident and be competent in your interactions with disabled people. It has been produced in conjunction with

    Respectful Interactions: Disability Language and Etiquette. Print-Friendly PDF Large-Print PDF. This guidance sheet offers tips and advice from people who have disabilities to help put everyone at ease. Because no two people disabilites are exactly alike, it is best to ask the person and follow the person's lead when it comes to what works best for them. Respectful Language. People-first language is based … Click here for a video presentation on Disability Etiquette. General Behavior. A wheelchair, cane, or any other assistive device used to help a person with a disability is considered part of their personal space and should never be leaned on, picked up, or touched.

    United Spinal Association's Disability Etiquette Publication offers tips on interacting with people with disabilities and feeling at ease about it. This booklet is for anyone—with or without a disability—who wants to interact more effectively with people with disabilities. Don’t grab a person with a vision impairment’s arm in order to guide them.. Do allow a person with a vision impairment to take your arm. This will help you to guide, rather than propel or lead, the person. Do use specifics such as “left a hundred feet” or “right two yards.”. Disability etiquette when you're with people with a hearing impairment:

    The Employers’ Forum on Disability also publishes a Disability Communications Guide on language and etiquette, specific impairments and preferred modes of assistance, and how to recognise and avoid attitudes and behaviour that can create What do Navigators Need to Know about Disability? How is Disability Defined? What Disability Questions Appear on the Streamlined Application for Health Insurance or Medicaid Submitted through the Marketplace? Why is Understanding Disability Important? What is Disability Literacy? What is Disability Etiquette? What is Physical Accessibility?

    Etiquette Tips. When interacting with a person with a disability it is important to be mindful of how best to do so, depending on his or her disability. These etiquette tips will help you in your relationship with a person with a disability. Quick Links: Persons Using Wheelchairs Persons with Speech Difficulties Disability Etiquette Guide Revised 6/19 3 General Guidelines for Talking About Different Disabilities There are many words to use and ways to refer to individuals with a disability. The following information is meant to answer some questions about what language to use and not to use.

    07-09-2015 · If we’re not used to dealing with disabled people, we may feel awkward when we come across someone with a disability. We may not know how best to help them – and we might cause offence without 07-09-2015 · If we’re not used to dealing with disabled people, we may feel awkward when we come across someone with a disability. We may not know how best to help them – and we might cause offence without

    disability etiquette guide

    Service Animal Guidelines, courtesy of The Guide Dog Foundation and America's VetDogs. Etiquette for Guide and Service Dogs (PDF) Guide dogs are the guiding eyes for people who are blind or visually impaired. Service dogs are assistance dogs for people with disabilities other than blindness. These dogs are specially bred and trained for this An estimated one billion or 15% of the world’s population experience some form of disability or the other. About 26.8 million people with disabilities live in India alone. 13.4 million of them fall in the employable age group of 15-59 years and as many as 9.9 million are either non-workers or marginal workers. Over a decade or more, a lot has been done in the field of disability in terms of awareness generation and …